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AUGUST 16, 1896


DAWN OF THE KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH

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AUGUST 16, 1896


DAWN OF THE KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH

“There’s gold, and it’s haunting and haunting; It’s luring me on as of old" - R. Service

A BRIEF HISTORY

In the summer of 1896, Skookum Jim Mason of the Tagish First Nation, alongside George Carmack and Kate Carmack, first found gold along the shores of Bonanza Creek. This discovery spawned one of histories largest mass migrations of prospectors - or Stampeders as they were come to be known -  to one of the most dangerous and remote regions of the world. People from all walks of life, most with little to no knowledge of mining or survival in harsh environments, attempted the arduous trek from Skagway, Alaska, to Dawson City, Yukon.

Over the span between 1896 and 1900, over 100,000 Stampeders ventured for the Klondike goldfields, of which an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 succeeded. Of these, historians estimate fewer than 4,000 found any gold, with only a few hundred making it big, while the rest returned home empty-handed, or perished in their pursuit.

 

Photo Credit: Henry Joseph Woodside/Library and Archives Canada/PA-016220

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Cremation of Sam McGee


RECITED BY JOHNNY CASH

Cremation of Sam McGee


RECITED BY JOHNNY CASH

Photo Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-005389